TOUGH CHOICES IN UKRAINE: FIGHT, FLIGHT, OR RIDE OUT THE STORM

 

TOUGH CHOICES IN UKRAINE: FIGHT, FLIGHT, OR RIDE OUT THE STORM


Should Russia strike, Maria Bogatyrova, 32, is willing to volunteer for military service in Ukraine’s regular armed forces. Only if I had no other option would I leave. Otherwise, she replies, she’d like to be of assistance in some way. Experts and officials suggest the confrontation’s building phase is nearing its conclusion. Russia now possesses sufficient military weaponry within striking distance of Ukraine to carry out a major military campaign at any time.

Moscow’s ultimate goal may be to destabilize Ukraine’s pro-Western administration and replace it with a pro-Russian regime. The US Embassy in Ukraine sent an email to American citizens in Ukraine shortly after midnight on Friday, encouraging them to leave the country immediately. According to the communication, military action could begin at any time and without warning.

Joel Wasserman, a Kyiv-based English teacher, and writer relocated to Lviv. The advance of Russian soldiers into Belarus concerns Wasserman. He feels there is a good likelihood that Russia will invade Kyiv with those forces. By leaving early, Wasserman was able to carry his costly goods and his cat in comfort. I’m gathering all of our vital documents and preparing my child for what to do in the event of a bombing.

But I understand that this will not be enough to prepare us for the horrors of war. Coffee or Die spoke with Miriam Dragina, a journalist based in Kyiv. Alex Shtohryn, a digital marketer and entrepreneur, made the decision to migrate to western Ukraine, where his family owns a farm. If Russia invades, he predicts a major evacuation of residents from the capital city. The battle in Ukraine’s eastern Donbas region is still going on, with over 14,000 people killed so far. Many inhabitants in Kyiv, for example, are now concerned that their city may be caught in Russia’s crosshairs.

For years, passengers could get McDonald’s breakfast at the Kyiv train station and disembark in Avdiivka, a front-line town. For many Ukrainians, the war’s buffer — both in terms of physical distance and emotional proximity — is crumbling.

Civil society in Ukraine has banded together to prepare the civilian population for conflict. Many Ukrainians are also facing financial difficulties. Unlike in the United States, many Ukrainians do not keep their money in bank accounts. For many, packing a carry-on suitcase and abandoning their home is a return to financial zero. Civilian volunteer organizations are teaching people how to perform military first aid, construct go-bags, and locate the nearest bomb shelter.

“We’re praying for the best, but bracing for the worst,” Liudmyla Bileka, a combat medic, and war veteran says. Most Ukrainians have no romantic views about war after eight years of conflict in their nation.

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